Appalachian Species & Grades

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Ash

Other Common Names: Biltmore Ash or Biltmore White Ash

Northwest’s Ash is grown in both the Glacial and Appalachian regions. Ash is a favorite with furniture and architectural millwork manufacturers. A light-colored species with an open grain and a coarse texture similar to oak, Ash is relatively dense with good working and finishing properties. The wood of Ash is economically important due to its strength, hardness, weight, and shock resistance. Ash is second only to hickory for use in the production of tool handles.

Ash wood is also used in antique vehicle parts, railroad cars and ties, canoe paddles, snowshoes, boats, doors, and cabinets.

Grades Avilable:

PROPERTIES

  • Machining 4
  • Nailing 4
  • Screwing 4
  • Gluing 4
  • Finishing 5

PROPERTIES OF Ash

Ash has good working properties, nailing, screwing and gluing very well. It is relatively lightweight for its strength, stiffness, shock resistance and has excellent flexibility and bending qualities. It takes stains and polishes well.

HOW DOES IT COMPARE

Lumber
(12 % moisture content)
Specific Gravity
(Density)
Dimensional
R
(%)
Movement
T
(%)
Hardness
(lbs)
Compression
Parallel
(ps)
Bending
Strength
(ps)
Bending
Stiffness
(kps)
Grain
Alder, red (Western).414.47.3590582098001380Fine
Ash.604.97.813207410154001770FIne
Birch, Yellow.627.39.512608170166002010FIne
Cherry, Black.454.27.85407200113001630Moad/Course
Hemlock.457.37.812607200113001630Moad/Course
Hickory.624.29.5540113001630Moad/Course
Maple, PC (Big Leaf).627.37.85407200113001630Moad/Course
Maple, silver (soft).627.37.85407200113001630Moad/Course
Maple, sugar (hard).627.37.81260113001630Moad/Course
Oak, Red (Northern).627.37.8540113001630Moad/Course
Oak, White.627.37.812607200113001630Moad/Course
Poplar, yellow.627.37.8540113001630Moad/Course
Walnut, black.657.37.8540113001630Moad/Course
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